The Italian Air Force celebrated the end of their Starfighter operations with a magnificently painted F-104S captured beautifully in this David Cenciotti photograph. To learn more about this amazing aeroplane, please click here.

The Italian Air Force celebrated the end of their Starfighter operations with a magnificently painted F-104S captured beautifully in this David Cenciotti photograph. To learn more about this amazing aeroplane, please click HERE.

Exactly sixty-two years ago today, the very first Lockheed Starfighter took to the skies over Edwards Air Force Base with legendary test pilot, Tony LeVier at the controls. Technically, it was not the first flight for the XF-104, but a brief hop about 5′ in the air during high speed taxiing tests in late February hardly counts as first flights go. Interestingly, both of the XF-104’s were designed around the under-powered J-65 turbojet rather than the J-79, which would become the standard production engine. Lockheed knew that the GE J-79 wouldn’t be ready in time, so went with the Wright J-65 (a license-built Armstrong-Siddeley Sapphire) for the initial test articles.

The first XF-104, serial number 53-7786, on a test flight near Edwards AFB. This aircraft crashed in 1957 following flutter problems which ripped the tail from the fuselage. The pilot, Bill Park, ejected safely. (image via Wikipedia)

The first XF-104, serial number 53-7786, on a test flight near Edwards AFB. This aircraft crashed in 1957 following flutter problems which ripped the tail from the fuselage. The pilot, Bill Park, ejected safely. (image via Wikipedia)

Astonishingly, the XF-104 went from the initial contract to first flight in less than a year, which is pretty remarkable given today’s turn-around rate. Mind you, a lot of simulation prior to first flight occurs these days, and one shouldn’t forget that both XF-104 prototypes crashed during testing. Still, even with the technical difficulties experienced, the Air Force was sufficiently impressed with the Starfighter that it ordered them into production. And while it didn’t stay on front-line service with American units for long, it became an extremely successful, low-cost export fighter. Fifteen air forces around the world employed the F-104, coming from seven non-US production lines. Even more surprisingly, more than twice as many Starfighters rolled from foreign factories as did from Lockheed’s. The type was in production until 1979, an astonishing run for any aircraft, let alone a front-line jet fighter. The final example came from the FIAT factory in Italy, with the Italian Air Force being the last to retire their fleet in 2004. Just a handful of F-104s remain airworthy today flying research contracts with Starfighters Inc. operating from the Kennedy Space Flight Center on Merritt Island near Titusville, Florida. See here for more details.

Starfighters Incorporated's Canadian-manufactured CF-104D serial #104632 at an air show. (photo via wikipedia)

Starfighters Incorporated’s Canadian-manufactured CF-104D serial #104632 at an air show. The company owns nine of the aircraft, with at least three being in current airworthy condition. (photo via wikipedia)

3 Comments

  1. George E. Davis Jr. says:

    I had the honor of being assigned to the 83rd FIS in the early days of the program. Down seat, no tail hook, “A” engine, no ventral fin, and all that. The most challenging, the most satisfying, and the most fun I ever had with my clothes on.

    George E. Davis Jr.
    USAF Ret.
    Order of Starfighter Number 234

  2. William Bain says:

    I had the excitement of departing a dual in 1971, great bird but did not fly well without an engine.

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