Right now, XH558 is back in her hangar with minor maintenance tasks being undertaken.

Right now, XH558 is back in her hangar with minor maintenance tasks being undertaken.

We have recently reported that the Vulcan XH558 had to cancel the remaining flights this year due to the fuel tank issue. Now the management  have turned the attention to securing the necessary funding to safeguard not only the immediate future of XH558, but the planning needed to achieve success with the pledge fund campaign within Operation 2015. This is intended to secure sufficient promised funding to enable the flying life extension to become reality. This would then give XH558 the potential for another two full display seasons.
Other than the fuel tank, XH588 is in superb overall condition with on-going maintenance tasks being completed this week. These tasks are defined as out of phase (OOP’s). OOP’s allow system components to be changed or inspected and lubricated on a regular basis, for example; the brake parachute and the 28v battery have to be changed every 28 days whether the aircraft has flown or not. The next program of servicing that the engineers are preparing for is anti-deterioration. This is required if the aircraft does not fly for a set period of time and various tasks have to be carried out every 14 and 28 days. Next week, as part of this, we will undertake engine ground runs.

Cleanliness is very important to ensure continuing reliability. The pipes entering the engines are linked to dehumidifiers to reduce airborn moisture that could accelerate corrosion

Cleanliness is very important to ensure continuing reliability. The pipes entering the engines are linked to dehumidifiers to reduce airborn moisture that could accelerate corrosion

As XH558 waits for confirmation that the winter service and MOD 2221 (the flying life extension) can proceed, systems like the engines need to be prepared for winter maintenance. For this, the F34 fuel in the engine system needs to be replaced with an inhibiting oil to protect the silver components in the CMFS – Chassis Mounted Fuel System – (the Carburettor), which are vulnerable to deterioration if left to soak in F34 fuel. The engineers will complete this task in late October. For the remainder of the next month or so, the engineering team will be located at the hangar but also returning to Hinckley to help with the bay service of some components and the identification of others for disposal.

If you want to contribute to keep this amazing machine flying click HERE

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